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Old 03-17-2006, 02:55 PM   #1
nthfinity
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Default Panning action shots (post pictures, and suggestions etc.)

http://nthimage.energywise-group.com...gs/panning.htm

each one is different... and i think it will help improve the quality of photos during photoshoots, and street sightings etc.

http://nthimage.energywise-group.com...ac_CTS_V_1.jpg

this one the point of focus is behind the front wheel well, and really, looks terrible... one interesting thing about it, however, is its become a super-wide looking shot.

http://nthimage.energywise-group.com...da_S2000_1.jpg

this one might have faired better if the focus was at, or slightly above the front wheel... but, the front facia is quite sharp.... ultimately, its a loss IMO.

http://nthimage.energywise-group.com...san_350Z_2.jpg

this one is nearly as good as it can be (with no IS) the one problem is the rear end is cut off the frame. its interesting how the perspective distorts what is not in focus (the front wheel) as it's angle reletive to me is approaching perpindicular... an interesting effect; and doesnt lose the character of the car. id like to increase my abilities with this shot.

http://nthimage.energywise-group.com...san_350Z_1.jpg

this one the fucus isn't quite clear, but the shot isn't all bad in my opinion; the suv in the way ruins the shot to some degree. a sightly higer ISO, or more open aperature could've reduced post-processing grain.

http://nthimage.energywise-group.com...abriolet_1.jpg
this one, the point of focus is the front overhang, quite clearly... but the level of distortion over the rear makes this one quite terrible IMO. this time, the angle approaches 180 degrees reletive to me. it may have been helped if tried to hit it closer to perpindicular, or while approaching me and hitting the front overhang.
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Old 03-17-2006, 04:17 PM   #2
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tried some last year @ the f1 race
kinda of hard for where is was sitting (really tight)
but my first try was bad. 2nd time kinda worked


first try


this year i hope to do better...
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Old 03-17-2006, 05:33 PM   #3
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The way I've always done it is take pictures with just about every setting you have on your camera. Write down what you did in each picture. Then go from there.
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Old 03-17-2006, 07:17 PM   #4
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^^^^
well, with changing light; and styles of panning a moving subject... you'll have a different result each time. if you can hone a style... im just giving my recent examples, and i'd like to see others' examples, and descriptions on how they did it.

of course, i'd be more hten happy to elaborate on any picture i take etc.
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Old 03-18-2006, 06:45 AM   #5
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Not wanting to be rude, but nth, all the ones you posted are basically too blurry to be considered as "good" pics Basically it was just too dark and shutter speed too low to get good results
IMO even with an IS you can't go much lower than 1/80 or 1/60 for a panning shot. Usually I don't bother about F and I shoot in shutter speed priority when doing panning shots, and indeed I work between 1/60 and 1/100, depending on the speed of the car. Of course the car has to be driven at constant speed for better results ;9
For sure they are artistic, but there is no sharp point at all in them
Your RX8 picture is much better for instance

Here is a couple of mine.. the only way to achieve good results with slow shutter speed is to have an IS (I am pretty shaky myself) and to be in control of the situation: beeing able to shoot many pics with the car passing by many times at a constant speed

These ones were 1/80 but to get them right I had to take a ton of pics, even with IS (car traveling at around 100 kmh)


1/100 but when you shoot a 3/4 panning shot of course only the point you are following is sharp.. usually the front, and the backend is usally blurry.. it's due to the angle, but I suppose the quicker the shutter speed, the better.. but you'll end up with less sense of speed.. so...


Again 1/100 and cars traveling at a constant 80 kmh ... for my style and my preferences, 80 to 100 kmh and 1/80 1/100 is perfect.. 1/60 would be even better, but too hard to have a good shot


BTW, I find very difficult to take panning shots of cars from the rear, ence going away from me.. I never seem to pick a good focusing point and to keep it steady :roll:
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Old 03-18-2006, 08:18 AM   #6
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Not wanting to be rude, but nth, all the ones you posted are basically too blurry to be considered as "good" pics Basically it was just too dark and shutter speed too low to get good results
no offence taken; i think they are crap too (what i posted about each one) the only thing i really liked about them was its quite clear where the distortion is; and where it happens/what to expect. thanks for your wright up with your shots; i think it'll help me, and others when hunting cars. 8)
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Old 03-18-2006, 09:52 AM   #7
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Many thanx TT, I will remember your advices!!! they will be very helpful very soon on very nice place to use

appreciate your time for explanation :good:

edit: I'm registered on one site dedicated to photography and there is one guy, who attends rally races. I asked him about the shutter times some time ago and he told me about 1/125 - 1/250s, faster curves 1/250 - 1/320s
this shot is 1/60s


and this one is 1/100s
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Old 03-18-2006, 01:58 PM   #8
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Yeah, if the car is travelling quick then you ideally need 1/125 - 1/250. Going too slow on the shutter just means blurry pics.

I took this at 1/250 at 100mm (not cropped)

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Old 03-18-2006, 08:06 PM   #9
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^^^ the rims in that shot are amazing
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Old 03-18-2006, 11:19 PM   #10
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Here are some of my panning shots at Laguna Seca - Monterey Historics:

Aston DBR1


Ferrari Testarossa


Maserati Birdcage


In general, I find that I can get the panning shot best if I tilt the camera about 45 degrees to the left or right so thet the car is in the middle of the diamond and follow the car for quite a bit so that the camera can get a good read of the car's speed. The first two pictures are using this technique.

I use the automatic settings and pray for the best. NO manual settings - I am a neophyte

I find this technique really helps with filming F1 cars that are so friggin fast, half of my shots have only parts of the car and not the whole because I was too slow to keep up with it.
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Old 03-19-2006, 06:14 PM   #11
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Tilting the camera can be a nice trick, but you should then try to put the pics straight or anyway less tilted afterward (PS or whatever). aren't they a bit too tilted like they are? I often use the same technique every now and then but usually I straighten then a little bit or completely while I edit them

BTW, an IMPORTANT detail when we talk about fast cars. you need good lenses, period: i tried to shoot "quick" cars with my EF 70-300 mm F4.5/5.6 IS and although quite quick for a not-L lense, the difference there is with any of the L I tested is AMAZING and definitely on track you need a very quick lenses at that because "cheap" ones will always be a bit late, or most of the time anyway.
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Old 03-19-2006, 06:45 PM   #12
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Thanks TT, one of these days I will be buying an SLR camera and I will be depending on you for some good advice for camera and lenses that are well suited for taking racing pictures...
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Old 05-17-2006, 01:00 AM   #13
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Sorry to bring this topic up again, seems pointless to start a new thread. Anyways i always wanted to try panning shots but im confused what mode do i put it on?! The camera i have is a Canon EOS 350D SLR.

Appreciate the help guys.
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Old 05-17-2006, 01:18 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by mrai
Sorry to bring this topic up again, seems pointless to start a new thread. Anyways i always wanted to try panning shots but im confused what mode do i put it on?! The camera i have is a Canon EOS 350D SLR.

Appreciate the help guys.
There is a setting called "Shutter Priority", for my SLR, its an "S" on the round dial, I'm guessing the same for Canons. This allows you to set the Shutter speed...you have to experiment to find a good one, depends on the situation, etc...and the camera automatically picks the best aperture to get the exposure.

I guess if you are really hardcore you could do full manual, but "S" is the best I think.

TT, is the expert, he will probably pipe in too...
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Old 05-17-2006, 01:21 AM   #15
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Thank you for your help, appreciate but i just took a peak at the camera there is no 'S' on the dial, i think its a different one, 'AV'?! Anyways thanks again, hope TT can fill me in.
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